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Afghan government removes chief of police from Kabul due to bomb attacks

The removal of Amanullah Wahidi follows the succession of bombings in the last few months, with four attacks occurring in the last 24 hours.

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JAWAD JALALI & sol; EPA

JAWAD JALALI & sol; EPA

The government of Afghanistan this Saturday ordered the dismissal of the leader of the police in Kabul and several subordinates of Amanullah Wahidi, in the face of the succession of bombings in the past months, with four attacks occurring in the last 24 hours.

“The chief of police in Kabul was dismissed after his inability to respond to recent security lapses, including the recent increase in explosions, targeted assassinations and rocket attacks,” a senior police commander for the Ministry of the Interior, which requested anonymity.

In addition to Wahidi, two other district police chiefs in the capital and 16 of his subordinates were fired in an effort by the Afghan executive to try to reinforce the security climate, whose deterioration has sparked criticism and increased citizen dissatisfaction. According to the source, the decision came from the highest levels, namely Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and the Interior Ministry.

In the past three months, security forces have disabled more than 200 homemade bombs and explosives in Kabul, according to ministry spokesman Tariq Arian , who added that 11 rebels were arrested in August for calls the production of these devices. The attacks mainly target members of the security forces, government officials, activists and religious leaders.

Only this Saturday there were four explosions in various parts of the Afghan capital, causing the death of two people and injuring six others.

Tariq Arian attributed the attacks to the Taliban, who had recently promised to end the bomb attacks, claiming that the rebels “want to exert psychological pressure and worry the Afghan citizens.”

Despite these attacks, both the Taliban and the Afghan government have revealed that they are ready to start peace talks soon. , as soon as the prisoner exchange process set out in the historic February 29 agreement , between the United States and the insurgents in Doha (Qatar), is completed.

The Taliban have already released more than 1,000 elements from Afghan forces, while the government approved last week the release of the last 400 out of 5. 000 prisoners demanded by the rebels.

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